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Birth Mother Rachel Steele


Sonny has found his birth step-mother after a long search and set out to meet her for the first time. Rachel gave him up for adoption because she was too young and her family refused to help her. A day did not go by without thinking of her step-son. She made sure the agency left him her information in case he ever wanted to find her. It was a shock when Rachel answered the door. A handsome young man dressed up in a starched white dress shirt stood before her. His eyes were green like Rachel's. He smiled and asked her her name. He told her he was her step-son. Rachel covered her face and gasped. He stepped in the door way to console her. Rachel thought he would be angry with her but he asked for a hug. She was thrilled he had found her and grabbed him tight. He was big and strong and so handsome. He called her by her first name and she told to call her step-mom. She hugged him again and then - after a moments hesitation - gave him a kiss on the cheek. She invited him to sit while she fetched some cold drinks. Sonny could not help notice how sexy she was. He felt attracted to her sexually. Rachel never married or had any other offspring. She was devastated at what happened. She could not reach the glasses so Sonny offered to help. He reached around her pushing her into the counter. She felt his groin on her lower back. Rachel turned around to try to slip out of the awkward position she was in. Sonny stopped her and looked at her beautiful green eyes. He kissed her on the lips and pulled her in tight. Rachel did not know how to react and she let it happen. Sonny pulled back to apologize. Both of them felt strange. They talked about how they felt about each other. Sonny confessed it was hard to look at her as his step-mom. Rachel agreed that it was difficult to see him as her step-son. Sonny put his glass down and kissed her again. Rachel locked lips with her long lost step-son. They made their way to the table where he lay here down. Sonny lifted her skirt and slid her panties off. Rachel arched her back and waited for his hot tongue. She had not had sex in years. She did not feel worthy. Sonny made his step-mother cum hard. He fingered her in just the right way causing her to squirt all over his hand. Rachel sat up, her hair tasseled. She dropped to her knees ready for his cock. She looked him in the eyes as she opened her mouth and guided his cock in her mouth. He moaned out her name. They took it into the bedroom. Rachel sat on his face in a 69 position. He made her cum over and over. She wanted him to make love to her and he wanted that as well. The heat between them was incredible. He made love to his step-mother until he pulled out and shot the largest load he had ever done. Rachel begged for it as she sat up and opened her mouth to catch all of it. Both of them were breathless, Rachel asked him to stay with her so they could start a new life. Sonny hugged her tight and told her they would never be apart again.




Birth Mother Rachel Steele



Part two of MILF 529. Sonny has found his birth mother after a long search and set out to meet her for the first time. Rachel gave him up for adoption because she was too young and her family refused to help her. A day did not go by without thinking of her son. She made sure the agency left him her information in case he ever wanted to find her; 20 years later he did. They chatted and one thing led to another. Rachel had not had sex in years. She did not feel worthy. Sonny made his mother cum hard. He fingered her in just the right way causing her to squirt all over his hand. Rachel sat up, her hair is tasseled. She dropped to her knees ready for his cock. She looked him in the eyes as she opened her mouth and guided his cock in her mouth. He moaned out her name. They took it into the bedroom. Rachel sat on his face in a 69 position. He made her cum over and over. She wanted him to make love to her and he wanted that as well. The heat between them was incredible. He made love to his mother until he pulled out and shot the largest load he had ever done. Rachel begged for it as she sat up and opened her mouth to catch all of it. Both of them were breathless, Rachel asked him to stay with her so they could start a new life. Sonny hugged her tight and told her they would never be apart again.


John was born on the 14th day of March, 1845, at Frazer, St. Joseph's Parish; his mother died in 1853, when he was eight years of age, and, as the boy was a favorite in his family for brightness, modesty, and candor, his father sought to give him the best advantages possible. He received home instruction from a half-sister. Mr. J. W. Hewett was his first public instructor, and by recommendation of Bishop Parry, of the Established Church of England, he was sent to St. John's Lodge, where in four years he completed its curriculum, graduating at the head of his class of fifty-six (white and colored) young men, delivering the valedictory address; and the following four years were spent in Codrington College, on the island of his birth, carrying with him first honor, favorable prophecy, and kindest wishes of his instructors and acquaintances.


James Bartlett Johnson was born a slave in Taylor County, Ky., about March, 1830. Like most slaves he does not know the exact date of his birth. He was reared by a Christian mother, and at the age of eighteen years was converted and joined the Church. From hisREV. J. B. JOHNSON.


FRANKLIN COUNTY, AR BIOGRAPHIES - K, L, M----------------------------------------------------------------------SOURCE: History of Benton, Washington, Carroll, Madison, Crawford,Franklin, and Sebastian Counties, Arkansas. Chicago: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889.----------------------------------------------------------------------William Kendrick, a well-to-do and progressive farmer of White Oak Township, was born in Tuscaloosa County, Ala., March 10, 1831, and is a son of Wiley and Charity (Radian) Kendrick, natives of Tennessee and Alabama, respectively. Both died in Pontiac County, Miss., of cholera, in 1842, aged about thirty-five years. The father was a mechanic and farmer, and he and wife became the parents of nine children, only two of whom are living: Wiley, who is a farmer of Monroe County, Ark., and William. The latter and his elder brother reared, cared and provided for the younger members of the family, following the occupation of farming. The latter was also engaged in overseering a portion of the time, and when starting out in life for himself it was without means. He acquired a considerable amount of property before the war, but during that lamentable struggle all his property was destroyed. He now has one of the finest farms in Franklin County, Ark., consisting of 212 acres, which is the result of energy and business ability. In March, 1861, he enlisted in Capt. Davis' company, Col. Churchill's regiment, Confederate States Army, and after the battle of Shiloh was engaged in scouting during the remainder of the war. In December of 1860 he was married to Annie Taylor, who died in 1868, in Monroe County, Ark., where she was born. At the time of her death she was about twenty-three years of age. She left three children, who are all living in Franklin County: Cornelius, Samuel and Calvin. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Afterward Mr. Kendrick married Elvira Givins, who also died in her native county (Monroe) fifteen months later. His [p.1251] third and present wife is Mary Threadgill, a daughter of William Threadgill. She was born in Tennessee, and is the mother of five children: Ada, Oscar, John, Charles and Henrietta. Previous to the war Mr. Kendrick located in Monroe County, Ark., and in 1877 came to Franklin County, where he has since made his home. He is a member of the Methodist Church, and is a Democrat. ----------------------------------------------------------------------William V. King was born in Anderson District, S. C., March 9, 1832, and is a son of Lyndon and Nancy (Hughes) King, natives of North Carolina and Virginia, respectively. His maternal grandfather, William Hughes, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The father was married in South Carolina, where he lived for several years after. He later moved to Paulding County, Ga., and there died in 1857. In Georgia William V. passed his youth, and when of age married. Laura Morrison, a native of Henderson County, N. C., became his wife in September, 1860, and is now the mother of seven children: Mary Jane, wife of H. C. Peters; Martha, wife of J. W. Taff; Cornelia, James T., I. M., Henry L. and Emma. In 1861 Mr. King enlisted in the Third Brigade of Col. Stephens' division, and served until the close of the war. He was in the fight at Tazewell, Tenn., August 6, 1862, and at Baker's Creek, Chickamauga, Resaca, New Hope and the siege of Atlanta. While on detached duty, in 1864, he was taken prisoner, and held the remainder of the time at Fort Delaware. In 1871 he returned to his family in Georgia, and in the fall of that year came to Arkansas, and homesteaded land in Franklin County. He now owns 180 acres of land, which he has purchased at different times, and has fifty acres in a fine state of cultivation. Mr. King is a member of the Masonic fraternity. ----------------------------------------------------------------------James P. King, a successful farmer, and one of the enterprising business men of Franklin County, Ark., is a native of Alabama, born September 30, 1832, and is the son of J. F. and Rachel (Gurley) King. The father was a native of Alabama, of Scotch-Irish descent, and was a Presbyterian minister. He died in 1856. The mother was born in North Carolina, and was of English-Scotch descent. She is still living, and is a resident of the State of Oregon. Their son, James P. King, moved with his parents to Arkansas when a small boy, and was nearly all over the State, but remained mostly in Madison County until fourteen years of age. He then engaged in agricultural pursuits, and this occupation he has since followed in connection with merchandising, which he carried on for fourteen years. He was married in Franklin County, Ark., in 1862, to Miss Jennie, daughter of E. and M. (Bently) Wilson, who were pioneers of the State of Arkansas. Mrs. King was born in Arkansas, and died on October 16, 1885. To their marriage were born eleven children, six now living: Mary C., James P., Emzey, Lena (wife of Gordon Garrett), Lee (at home), Benonia V. Mr. King is the owner of 7,000 acres of land, 265 acres under cultivation, making one of the best stock farms in the county, and bountifully supplied with wells, etc. He erected a gin mill in 1868, at a cost of $6,000, and combined with this he has a flouring and corn mill. ----------------------------------------------------------------------Noble R. Mckinney is a son of George and Catherine (Dorland) McKinney, and was born on May 11, 1837, being one of three surviving members of a family of twelve children. George McKinney was born in Georgia, and died in Franklin County, Ark., in 1850, aged seventy-five years. He was a farmer; a soldier in the War of 1812, being a participant in the battle of New Orleans, and became a resident of Arkansas in 1837. His wife was born in South Carolina, and died in Franklin County, Ark., when her son, Noble R., was a child. The latter began doing for himself after his father's death, and met with a rough experience in his toils. He worked as a farm hand until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company C, Fifteenth Arkansas Infantry, Confederate States Army, serving four years. He was in many battles, among which are Corinth, Iuka. Pea Ridge, Oak Hill, Port Gibson, Baker's Creek, Black River and many others of less note. After his return from the war he purchased and improved an eighty acre tract of land, which he has since increased to 260 acres, with 160 under cultivation. He also deals quite extensively in stock. In October, 1861, he was united in marriage to Miss Emeline Crawford, a daughter of William Crawford. She was born in Franklin County, Ark., February 17, 1842, and became the mother of ten children: Martha J., Collins C., John S., Jesse, George G., Joseph S., Thomas E. and James Charles. Those deceased are William C. and Nancy E. Mr. McKinney is a stanch Democrat ----------------------------------------------------------------------Hon. William R. Mclane was born in Trigg County, Ky., July 8, 1832, and [p.1256] is a son of Samuel R. and Martha (Sholar) McLane, who were also born in Trigg County. The father was a farmer and tobacco manufacturer, and acquired a goodly fortune in pursuing these callings. He was a minister of the Missionary Baptist Church, a Democrat in polities, and after his wife's death, which occurred in Trigg County, Ky., when her son, William R., was an infant, he was married to Nancy Jane Lacy, who died in Callaway County, Ky. William R. McLane is the only child by his father's first union, but he has a half sister and two half brothers, who are living: Martha B., now Mrs. Adkins, of Henry County, Tenn.; Thomas J., also of Henry County, and Henry H., a farmer of Kansas. William R. made his father's house his home until 1854, and acquired a good English education in the common school near his home, and at Conyersville (Tenn.) Academy. After leaving home he went to St. Clair County, Mo., in 1856, where he was engaged in farming until 1862, and then went to Saline County of the same State, in which he made his home for seven years. He then resided in Bates County, Mo., for one year, since which time Franklin County, Ark., has been his home. In 1850 he joined the Missionary Baptist Church, and in 1858 was ordained a minister of that denomination by J. B. Box, J. C. Brashear and Obadiah Smith. During his career as a minister he has organized many churches in Missouri and Arkansas, and is now pastor of Reboboth and Shiloh Churches. November 8, 1854, he was married to Mary H., daughter of Slaton Bourland. She was born in Kentucky, May 1, 1838, and became the mother of ten children, nine of whom are living: Albert M., Ella A. (wife of J. L. Swaim), James G., John A., Minnie (wife of John W. Lancaster), Charles L., Samuel S., Mary C. and William Paul. Malissie T. died in infancy. Mr. McLean is a Democrat; in 1884 he was elected on the Brothers of Freedom ticket (a farmers' organization, of which he was a member at that time, though none the less a Democrat), to represent Franklin County in the State Legislature, filling the office one term. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a man who commands the respect and esteem of all who know him. ----------------------------------------------------------------------James R. Mclaughlin, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Franklin County, Ark., March 9, 1851, his parents being William W. and Mary A. (Kuykendall) McLaughlin. The father was born in Tennessee, and when a lad of eleven went to Illinois, where he grew to manhood. In 1833 he went to Crawford County, Ark. After his marriage he lived in both Crawford and Washington Counties, and about 1840 came to Franklin County, where he farmed in White Oak Township until his death, in May, 1881. Mrs. McLaughlin was born in Indiana, and reared in Arkansas. She now lives in this county. Eight sons and four daughters, born to her, grew to maturity, and of these five sons and three daughters are living. Four of the sons are in this county, and one resides in Sebastian County. James R. passed his youth upon a farm, near where he now resides. He remained at home until his marriage, in 1872, to Matilda M. Reynolds, a native of Virginia, who was reared in Georgia, and is a daughter of Abram Reynolds, deceased. In 1873 Mr. McLaughlin bought a place which was but slightly cleared, but which he has converted into a nice farm of eighty acres of cultivated land, the whole tract containing 160 acres. He has a nice one and a half story residence, surrounded with good out buildings, and has an apple orchard of 600 trees, and another containing 250 peach trees. In 1876 Mr. McLaughlin was elected justice of the peace of his township. Upon the expiration of his term he was re-elected, and served another term. After being out of office one term he was again chosen to fill the position, which he did for two more terms. Mr. McLaughlin is interested in the educational advancement of the county, and has been a member of the school board six years. ----------------------------------------------------------------------William W. Mansfield, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Kentucky. After receiving a common-school education he studied law in the office of Judge Loving, at Bowling Green, in that State, and was admitted to the bar there in 1852. Early in the following year he came to Arkansas, and located at Ozark, which has ever since been his home. He was among the first school-teachers of the village, and while thus engaged served also for a short time as justice of the peace, having been appointed to fill a vacancy in that office. While thus occupied he pursued his studies and gave attention to the small legal business which was occasionally entrusted to him. After two or three years his law business increased, and he was enabled to relinquish other employments. In 1856 he was chosen to represent Franklin County in the General Assembly, and served in that body to the satisfaction of his constituents. Two years later he [p.1257] was an unsuccessful candidate for the office of prosecuting attorney. He was a delegate to the convention of 1861, which passed an ordinance of secession, and was a member of the convention of 1874, which framed the present constitution of the State. At the first election held under the new constitution he was elected judge of the Fifth Judicial Circuit, and occupied that position until near the close of his term, in 1878, when he resigned, and resumed the practice of the law. In 1882 his name was submitted to the Democratic State Convention of that year as a candidate for Congressman for the State at large. He was defeated by Hon. C. R. Breckinridge. Under an act of the Legislature he was appointed by Gov. Berry, in 1883, to digest the statutes of the State, and compiled the work published in 1884, and usually referred to as "Mansfield's Digest." After completing his labors as digester he again returned to the practice of his profession, in which he continued until October, 1887, when he was appointed reporter of the supreme court. The latter office he occupies at this date (1888). In the year 1859 Judge Mansfield was united in marriage to Miss Sallie H. Shores, a native of Franklin County. She and her husband are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Their present family consists of four sons and two daughters. ----------------------------------------------------------------------Thomas W. Marlar is a native of Fayette County, Tenn., born in 1835, and is the son of James and Catherine Marlar, both natives of Tennessee, and both of Scotch descent. They moved to Fran


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