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Where To Buy Zenbo Robot



Asus (ASUUY) may be best known as the maker of laptops and phones, but on Monday it unveiled a fairly low-cost robot that can help with heathcare and controlling the smart home. (Also, it unveiled new laptops and phones.)




where to buy zenbo robot



Zenbo is a robot from Asus that responds to voice commands, has a touchscreen display that functions both as a face and information screen, and wheels that allows the robot to follow you around the house.


The robot can also let you use its camera and display to make video calls, and Asus has announced a partnership with the Taiwan National Police Agency to let you place an emergency video call through Zenbo.


Personal home robots are the hot new thing right now. Everything from robots that protect your home to those that act as personal chefs are being developed, and simultaneously, a number of companies are advancing technology to build the new "smart home."


You'll be able to check who's at the door from a connected camera, and then remote unlock the door from the robot's touchscreen face. Zenbo will also be able to connect to lights, TVs and air conditioners.


According to Bloomberg, Amazon (AMZN 1.26%) is developing a "home robot" codenamed "Vesta." Amazon's Lab126 hardware R&D unit -- which created the Echo, Fire TV, and Fire tablets -- is overseeing Vesta's development.


Amazon will reportedly start testing the robots in some employees' homes later this year, followed by a possible consumer launch in 2019. It's unclear exactly what Vesta will do, but Bloomberg's sources speculate that it could autonomously navigate around homes while providing Alexa services.


In other words, Amazon's Vesta could resemble Asus' (ASUUY -23.08%) Zenbo home robot, a $600 device which it launched in Taiwan almost two years ago. That Android-powered robot, which TechCrunch describes as a "real-world version of BB-8," can control smart home devices, respond to voice queries, take pictures, and act as a home security system.


That expanding ecosystem gives Amazon a sturdier foundation for launching an Alexa-powered home robot than Asus, which introduced an interesting product but failed to support it with adequate marketing or enough developers.


The Zenbo's $600 price tag was also too high for a device marketed as a companion robot for kids and seniors. Amazon, however, often sells its hardware at break-even or negative margins, then recoups those losses with digital or retail revenues. Therefore Amazon could launch its Vesta home robot at a much lower price than the Zenbo or other comparable products.


Amazon's success with the Echo, which caused other companies to launch their own smart speakers, shows that it can create new markets. If it takes a similar approach with the "Vesta" -- named after the Roman goddess of the hearth, home, and family -- it could launch a new market and send its rivals scrambling to develop their own home robots.


My parents, being generally sensible people, figured that it was unlikely their elementary school-aged son would actually take full responsibility for a live canine. So, given that they're also major nerds, they bought me a robot dog for Channukah.


Privacy and creepiness concerns aside, the Amazon Astro does look fairly cool. The distinctly Wall-E looking Alexa-powered robot features a digital face designed to make it look as little like a Terminator as possible and offers a variety of cool smart home features.


All-in-all this is pretty impressive stuff and more than enough to get some of the younger whippersnappers on team Trusted Reviews brimming with excitement and eager to get the $1449.99 Astro robot in for review.


Though, like ZenBo, it was never widely adopted by general consumers, Segway is still working on similar robots with its B2B-focussed Loomo offering corporate bigwigs at Apple and Google an easy, high-tech, way to blitz around their campuses.


That's why its face is a screen that can show a lot more computerized emotion than a traditional robot, he said. It does this through a set of large eyes and an almost perpetual smile that makes Zenbo appear cute. It's a contrast to the Pepper robot from Aldebaran Robotics, which has a fixed face and screen mounted on its chest.


But even with the best industrial design in the world, the robot won't sell unless it's useful. In coming up with a sample series of apps, Asus has targeted Zenbo toward every member of the family, Shih said.


More Taiwan news about Zenbo: A collaboration with the National Police Agency (NPA) of Taiwan resulted in an app for Zenbo where a video calling feature lets families in emergencies contact their local police departments and speak with an officer. There was a live demo of the app.


The robot's appeal to children was not ignored; in fact, there is a "Blockly-based programming suite," reported Lai, "that will let children as young as five years old use basic logic to automate a Zenbo's movements."


Zenbo supports a growing number of custom apps. Also, there is a free Zenbo Developer Program providing members with access to the Zenbo SDK and a library of information. More information:zenbo.asus.com/ 2016 Tech Xplore


A cross-disciplinary project at the University of Delaware has resulted in the creation of a social robot that can deliver safe computing training to young students. Researchers from the university's College of Education & Human Development and the College of Engineering have worked together to produce and test the use of "Zenbo."


The researchers believe that the use of an interactive robot can boost student engagement over plain video watching and generate better outcomes in student knowledge about cybersecurity, especially for students with autism or emotional learning difficulties.


For example, the students recently listened as Zenbo delivered a rewrite of Little Red Riding Hood. The robot described how Red was leaving to visit her sick grandmother. But in this version, Red's mom has reminded her to safeguard the password needed to enter her grandmother's home. When she encounters the Big Bad Wolf in the woods, Red has to decide whether or not to share private information with a stranger.


"These checkpoints reinforce positive behaviors and create teachable moments for when children make mistakes," said Chrystalla Mouza, a professor in teacher education. "It's important that this training is provided in school because we cannot rely on it being provided elsewhere."


The robot is currently capable of much the same tasks as you would expect of a voice-controlled tablet computer on wheels, albeit with a select number of custom applications -- such as a library of stories that involve different voices, and controlling the room's lighting, as well as reminding seniors of appointments and notifying family members in the case of a fall -- but the company is looking for partners and developers to get on board.


"For decades, humans have dreamed of owning such a companion: One that is smart, dear to our hearts, and always at our disposal," Shih said. "Our ambition is to enable robotic computing for every household."


Its premium model, the Zenfone 3 Deluxe, has a 5.7-inch Super AMOLED display, a Snapdragon 820 processor, an Adreno 530 GPU, a 23-megapixel camera, and packs up to 6GB of RAM. ASUS said the phone has a metal unibody construction with no markings to show where the phone's antenna is. With USB-C, the phone is able to receive a charge of 60 percent in 39 minutes, and is set to cost upwards of $499.


Asus recently unveiled a family robot that can serve as a home healthcare assistant, control connected devices in the smart home, monitor security, perform various online tasks, and function as a playmate, among other things. Asus' Zenbo made its debut at last month's Computex computer show. At the same time, Asus launched a program that provides devs with access to the Zenbo SDK. Zenbo will be priced at US$600, but Asus did not announce when it will be available to consumers.


This follows the trend of personal robots building on the technology and services trends that made the smartphone popular. "You can see this as a smartphone or an Amazon Echo with mobility and the ability to point the screen, the camera sensor, infrared LED.


Who wouldn't like a robotic helper around the house to ease your domestic chores. Wooster had Jeeves, Batman had Alfred and even Blackadder helped out the Prince of Wales once in a while. The tech industry has been somewhat obsessed with helping out around the home in recent years, but is yet to come up with anything that can iron, make the tea and drop the kids off at school. So let's see if Zenbo can do any better.


Zenbo is apparently the brain child of Asus Chairman Jonney Shih, who had an ambition to 'enable robotic computing for every household'. This $599 home robot is designed to do just that, providing assistance, entertainment, and companionship to families.


"For decades, humans have dreamed of owning such a companion: one that is smart, dear to our hearts, and always at our disposal," Asus Chairman Jonney Shih said in a statement. "Our ambition is to enable robotic computing for every household."


At today's ASUS Zenvolution press event in advance of Computex, ASUS unveiled a new personal assistant robot for home use: Zenbo. The core functionality of Zenbo will be voice commands similar in principle to Amazon Echo, but Zenbo is also mobile and features a display as its face.


With industrial design reminiscent of Star Wars' BB-8, WALL-E's EVE, and early iMacs, Zenbo tries to be a cute and inviting device that projects a cartoonish demeanor. ASUS used an amusing 11-minute video to showcase features and use cases planned for the robot, including reminders, controlling home automation devices, photography, voice and video calling, and online shopping. ASUS is also establishing a developer program to encourage the creation of third-party applications to add further capabilities and integration with online services.


Asus chairman Jonney Shih started the company's keynote at Computex 2016 with the unveil of the ZenBo household companion. The ZenBo is a rather cute, distinctly Wall-E-looking little robot, which can communicate with you as well as do a plethora of services at your whim. 041b061a72


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